May 31st, 2014

look closer…

cTSHZGH

Amazing GIF image created using images from a scanning electron microscope:

As the incredibly powerful microscope zooms in, it goes from showing an amphipod (a type of shell-less crustacean), to a diatom (a type of algae) that’s on the amphipod, to a microscopic bacterium that’s on the diatom that’s on the amphipod. It’s life, on life, on life:

The GIF was created by James Tyrwhitt-Drake back in 2012, when he captured the images at the University of Victoria’s Advanced Microscopy Facility and posted the final product to his Tumblog, Infinity Imagined.

Via PetaPixel.

December 1st, 2013

Solar Set, Joseph Cornell

cornell

‘Untitled (Solar Set)’, Joseph Cornell, 1958.

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September 26th, 2013

tree

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Zhang Enli (Chinese, b. 1965), Tree, 2003. Oil on canvas, 146 x 113.7 cm.

August 31st, 2013

know your cacti

cacti

A charming guide to cacti and other desert plants… Click the image to see it larger. I’m afraid I couldn’t identify the source of the image.

August 25th, 2013

Hide Kawanishi

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Pond by Hide Kawanishi (1894-1965). Woodblock print.

Hide Kawanishi was born in Kobe as the son of an affluent family of merchants and ship-owners with a long tradition in commerce. The artist is considered a self-taught Sosaku Hanga artist. Typical for his print designs is the absence of black outlines. He did not like them and therefore had no admiration for classical Ukiyo-e. Hide Kawanishi took the subjects for his prints mainly from his hometown of Kobe. He preferred strong colors.

From artelino (via cacaotree)

August 25th, 2013

black table

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Richard Diebenkorn. Black Table, 1960. Collection of the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

August 3rd, 2013

New York

Kline

‘New York’, Franz Kline , 1953.

December 22nd, 2012

choreographie

Via Public Domain Review:

Collection of Dances in Choreography Notation (1700)
Images extracted from the latter half of Choregraphie, a book first published in 1700 which details a dance notation system invented by Raoul-Auger Feuillet which revolutionised the dance world. The system indicates the placement of the feet and six basic leg movements: plié, releveé, sauté, cabriole, tombé, and glissé. Changes of body direction and numerous ornamentations of the legs and arms are also part of the system which is based on tract drawings that trace the pattern of the dance. Additionally, bar lines in the dance score correspond to bar lines in the music score. Signs written on the right or left hand side of the tract indicate the steps. Voltaire ranked the invention as one of the “achievements of his day” and Denis Diderot devoted ten pages to the subject in his Encylopdédie.

The diagrams really get my imagination going.

October 26th, 2012

Lancelot Hogben

It turns out Lancelot Hogben was as impressive as his name promises.

I started reading about him after I found a copy of his 1938 book “Science for the Citizen”, illustrated by J.F. Horrabin. You can find this book on archive.org, but it doesn’t match the beauty of the printed version, in which text and diagrams melt into yellowed paper. It’s like a holy text. The attention to detail in the writing makes for educational luxury; it’s an educational text that actually has a soul and a sense of purpose.

From the Hogben’s introduction:

In the Victorian age big men of science like Faraday, T. H. Huxley, and Tyndall did not think it beneath their dignity to write about simple truths with the conviction that they could instruct their audiences. There were giants in those days. The new fashion is to select from the periphery of mathematicized hypotheses some half-assimilated speculation as a preface to homilies and apologetics crude enough to induce a cold sweat in a really sophisticated theologian who knows his job. With a few notable exceptions such as Simple Science by Andrade and Huxley and two volumes on British and American men of science by J. G. Crowther, this is a fair description of the state into which the writing of popular science has fallen hi contemporary Britain. The clue to the state of mind which produces these
weak-kneed and clownish apologetics is contempt for the common man. The key to the eloquent literature which the pen of Faraday and Huxley produced is their firm faith in the educability of mankind.

Apart from being a legendary zoologist, a writer, political activist and lecturer, Hogben was also a linguist. He invented Interglossa, an international language (‘a draft of an auxiliary for a democratic world order’).

Inimical to all traditional grammar, Hogben is certainly one of the most radical of all the interlinguists. He begins from the proposition that an international language is primarily of interest to scientists, and especially those from the East, who need an easy means of access to the conquests of Western science. All projects prior to his, which were always based on one or more European languages, were aimed solely at Western scholars. But of course the structure of the “Aryan” languages (that is, the Indo-Germanic and the Finno-Ugric languages) is not at all natural for a Japanese, a Chinese, or an African. In order to benefit these, an international language should be of the isolating, rather than the agglutinative, type, in contrast to all the previous attempts at universal languages.

More of that article here.

July 9th, 2012

tea eggs

Photo via globetrotterdiaries.

I just discovered the aggregatator/blog Tasteologie, home to some intriguing and experimental recipes. I have spent and will spend quite a while fishing for ideas here.

I will share two egg dishes that impressed me. One is the Chinese ‘tea egg’. Wiki:

Fragrant and flavorful tea eggs are a traditional Chinese food. The original recipe uses various spices, soy sauce, and black tea leaves. A commonly used spice for flavoring tea eggs is Chinese five-spice powder, which contains ground cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds, cloves and Szechuan peppercorns. Some recipes [1] do not use tea leaves, but they are still called “tea eggs”. In the traditional method of preparation, eggs are boiled until they reach a hardened, cooked state. The boiled eggs are removed from the water, and the entire shell of each egg is gently cracked all around. Smaller cracks produce more marbling when the egg is peeled for eating. The extra water from the boiling should be allowed to seep out of the eggs on its own. After about ten minutes, the cracked eggs are ready to be put into the prepared spiced-tea liquid and simmered at medium heat. The simmering allows the spiced fluid to seep into the cracks and marinate the eggs inside their shells. After about 20 minutes, the eggs and the spiced-tea liquid should be transferred to a glass or ceramic container for further steeping in a refrigerator. For best results, the eggs should be allowed to steep for two days. The dark color of the spiced tea gives the egg a marbled effect when it is peeled to be eaten.

The other recipe is simply an egg cooked inside a small courgette.


I would like to try the same but inside a small, white eggplant, like this one.


Eightball-Zuchinni Egg recipe
.

June 29th, 2012

tea caddy

Ornate tea chest for storing loose leaves. Image by Hans Grobbe via wikipedia.

June 12th, 2012

monkey orchid

Nature doesn’t need an audience. These wonderful orchids come from the south-eastern Ecuadorian and Peruvian cloud forests from elevations of 1000 to 2000 meters and as such not many people throughout history got to see them. However, thanks to intrepid collectors we do get to see this wonderful Monkey Orchid. Someone didn’t need much imagination to name it though, let’s face it.

This is one of the most incredible adaptations I’ve seen.. More about the Monkey Orchid at kuriositas.

June 3rd, 2012

what am I looking at?

I don’t really know how Shikhei Goh achieves such quality in his macro photography. I’ve never seen anything like it. But judge for yourself here. Above is a close-up of a dragonfly. (via boingboing)

May 29th, 2012

fuck art

A portrait of Lawrence Ferlinghetti, found in the series before/after on the blog If Charlie Parker Was a Gunslinger, There’d Be a Whole Lot of Dead Copycats.

May 29th, 2012

Tim Knowles, Tree Drawings

Stonethwaite Beck, Smithymire Island, Borrowdale, Cumbria. 1/07/2005

Here’s a video in which Knowles explains his process. (Via Myrvatje.)

May 29th, 2012

astronaut photoblog

Urenlang Dragon in de gaten houden tijdens de nadering is geen straf. Hier over Namibie.

Hours on end monitoring Dragon’s approach is no punishment. Here over Namibia.

The FlickR photostream of Dutch astronaut Andre Kuipers is a unique and visually beautiful insight into life in space…

See here.

May 29th, 2012

ray network

Found by Myrvatje. I don’t know where she found it or who took it.

May 4th, 2012

coal searcher going home to jarrow

Bill Brandt, Coal Searcher Going Home to Jarrow, 1937.

Photo via the blog hazel & wren.






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